Romney Says Obama Bribed Electorate

Mitt Romney, in calls to major donors to his presidential campaign, said President Barack Obama bought the election by giving “gifts” to his core constituency: that 47% of loafers and freeloaders who live below the income level that is taxable: African-Americans, Hispanics, and young and elderly voters.

Romney first proposed that Obama is supported by a core constituency of people who want free stuff from the government in early 2012 at an appearance before wealthy donors during the campaign. That appearance was secretly recorded and made a campaign football by the media. Romney recanted and said he was wrong, that his comments were crudely delivered, and at one point intimated that during a campaign it is standard practice to play to the prejudices of the audience.

But it appears Romney has returned to his theme of government-dependent freeloaders blindly supporting Obama to get government handouts as he attempts to rationalize his election loss to those who supported him, and ultimately to himself. He doesn’t see his failure as a result of his unpopular policies, his elitism, or his inability to understand the lives of average Americans. Instead it’s the fault of those poor people, the freeloaders who are looting our government of the hard-earned taxes the rich pay.

Not all Republicans failed to learn anything from the recent election, though. Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal criticized Romney’s remarks, saying “I don’t think that represents where we are as a party and where we’re going as a party. That has got to be one of the most fundamental takeaways from this election.”

Blair Says Murdoch Put Political Pressure On Him

Ex-British Prime Minister Tony Blair, testifying for an investigation into media bribery of police, said that media mogul Rupert Murdoch lobbied him directly when he was in power. “Pressure from him was more political than commercial” Blair said. Blair claims he is not “too cozy” with Murdoch, even though he is the godfather of one of Murdoch’s children.