U.S. Nuclear Plants Threatened By Floods, Wild Fires

NRC spokesmen claim flooding around a Nebraska nuclear power plant poses no threat.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is downplaying disaster threats to U.S. nuclear plants in Nebraska and New Mexico. They claim there is no similarity to the disaster at the Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan.

“In Japan there was an earthquake followed by a flood of seawater. In Nebraska there was no earthquake and the plant is being flooded with fresh water – totally different thing. Unless the water gets higher than say two feet and two inches inches. Then it will pour into the containment vessels and you’ll see massive explosions and melt-downs that will sterilize the entire state. But there is absolutely no chance the water will exceed the safe depth.”

Nebraska disaster response officials say the water surrounding the plant is at two feet, with more rain on the way.

This nuclear plant at Los Alamos, New Mexico is in the path of raging wildfires - but an NRC spokesman says the flames won't get close enough to be a threat.

Meanwhile, in New Mexico, another nuclear plant at Los Alamos is surrounded by raging wildfires. Again an NRC spokesman says there is nothing to worry about. “This isn’t anything like Japan, where they had an earthquake, a flood, and then major fires at the Fukushima plant. There were no earthquakes or floods here. Earthquakes and flooding are the real problems – I mean the fire would have to completely consume that plant, and to do that there would have to be high temperatures combined with high wind – and what are the chances of that?”

The New Mexico weather service has predicted high temperatures combined with wind will sweep the state for the next several days.

Workers Deploy Radiation Shield At Japanese Reactor

A super high-tech radiation shield developed by 3M was deployed at the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant Thursday in an effort to stop radiation leakage. The shield, made of a special flexible, light weight blue material, was gently lifted into place by members of the “Fukushima Fifty”: plant workers who have volunteered to stay-on at the plant in the face of high levels of radioactivity. “We have spared no expense in providing these brave people with the tools they need to get the job done” a Japanese offcial said.

Workers at the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant deploy a special radiation shield.

Iran Says “No Thanks” To Uranium Deal

Iran’s government turned down a United Nations proposal to enrich its uranium in Europe, to ensure the material is not used to make weapons. The plan was to ship all of Iran’s nearly two tons of uranium to several facilities in Europe, where it would likely get lost in the mail, and since Iran is notorious for not buying insurance on its packages, that would end any chance of Iran making nuclear weapons.

“The insurance is never needed!” Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said from Tehran. “Why increase the shipping cost for that? Besides, our uranium isn’t going anywhere. We can enrich it here – we have all the vitamin B we need.”

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad emphasizes a point. Not seen in the phot is his companion Mini Mahmoud.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad emphasizes a point. Not seen in the photo is his companion Mini Mahmoud.